Student Government winner01.JPG

Morgan Fritz, sophomore in political science, and Jacob Schrader, junior in economics and political science, embracing each other after they are elected Student Government president and vice president.

Morgan Fritz, sophomore in political science, and Jacob Schrader, junior in economics and political science, were elected as Student Government president and vice president Thursday evening.

“We’d just like to thank everyone that got out and voted, it’s really important that student voices are heard and we’re really looking forward to representing all students,” Fritz said.

Voting took place Tuesday and Wednesday after a little over a month of campaigning.

“It’s going to be an exciting year and I can’t wait to get to work for all Cyclones,” Schrader said.

The Fritz-Schrader campaign received 2,962 votes while the Greene-Hanyang campaign received 1,415 votes.

Fall enrollment numbers totaled 33,391, meaning with 4,534 total votes about 15.1 percent of the student body voted for president and vice president.

In comparison to last year, the percentage of the student body that voted is up by 0.2 percent, down 2.7 percent from the spring of 2018.

A total of 3,465 students voted Tuesday—making up 74.66 percent of the vote—and 1,176 students voted Wednesday—making up the final 25.34 percent of the vote.

Of the 4,534 votes, 157 were for write-in candidates.

Fritz and Schrader ran on a platform of addressing college affordability, campus climate and sustainability on campus.

Lydia Greene, junior in political science, and Joshua Hanyang, senior in management information systems, were running against Fritz and Schrader.

Greene and Hanyang ran on a platform of diversity and inclusion, mental health awareness, green initiatives, student government transparency and starting an initiative to implement a one credit, half-semester course called ISU 101.

SchraderFritzandGraber

Newly elected Student Government President Morgan Fritz, sophomore in political science, and Vice President Jacob Schrader, junior in economics and political science, with current Student Government President Austin Graber, senior in business economics.

Additionally, students voted for representatives of their respective colleges and constituencies.

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences elected Julie Anderson, junior in agriculture and society, and Hans Riensche, senior in agricultural business, as senators.

Anderson received 479 votes—37.36 percent of the vote, and Riensche received 471 votes—36.74 percent of the vote.

A total of 1,282 students voted for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences senators.

The College of Design elected Joshua Stephens, freshman in pre-community and regional planning, as a senator.

Stephens received 119 votes—56.67 percent of the vote.

A total of 210 students voted for the College of Design senators.

The College of Engineering elected Zachary Lewis, senior in electrical engineering, Leslie Lona, junior in biological system engineering and Abigail Schulte, sophomore in biological system engineering, as senators.

Lewis received 268 votes—12.12 percent of the vote, Lona received 387 votes—12.75 percent of the vote and Schulte received 472 votes—15.55 percent of the vote.

Andrew Grant, junior in electrical engineering, received 703 votes—23.16 percent of the vote—however, Grant’s votes were nullified by the Student Government Election Commission after it decided that he improperly sent out a mass email.

While Grant did win the seat, his results will remain nullified until a decision is made by the Student Government Supreme Court as he has appealed the decision made by the Election Commission.

A total of 3,036 students voted for the College of Engineering senators.

The Graduate College elected Jacob Minock, graduate student in business administration, as a senator.

Minock received five write-in votes—14.29 percent of the vote.

Alexis Samano, graduate student in education, Chuck Wongus, graduate student in education, and Prajjwal Jamdagni, graduate student in computer science, all received two write-in votes and are tied for the remaining seat.

A total of 35 students voted for the Graduate College senators.

The College of Human Sciences elected Emily Hovey, senior in event management, and Kimberly Zavoski, senior in hospitality management, as senators.

Hovey received three write-in votes—.55 percent of the vote, and Zavoski received four write-in votes—0.73 percent of the vote.

A candidate had previously been in who was awarded 522 votes, but withdrew from the race, nullifying those votes.

A total of 548 students voted for the College of Human Sciences senators.

Student Government winner02.JPG

Morgan Fritz, sophomore in political science, and Jacob Schrader, junior in economics and political science, giving a speech after they are elected Student Government president and vice president.

The Ivy College of Business elected Sanjana Addagarla, junior in management information systems, and Jack Bender, junior in accounting, as senators.

Addagarla received 282 votes—31.09 percent of the vote, and Bender received 435 votes—47.96 percent of the vote.

A total of 907 students voted for the College of Business senators.

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences elected Daniel Hayes, junior in political science, Jacob Ludwig, senior in economics, and Hayat Sumael, sophomore in criminal justice studies, as senators.

Hayes received 698 votes—33.32 percent of the vote—Ludwig received 698 votes—33.32 percent of the vote, and Sumael received 656 votes—31.31 percent of the vote.

A total of 2,095 students voted for the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences senators.

The College of Veterinary Medicine elected Clara Young, year one veterinary medicine student, as a senator.

Young received 107 write-in votes—83.59 percent of the vote.

A total of 128 students voted for the College of Veterinary Medicine senator.

Mariana Gonzalez, junior in political science, was elected as the Collegiate Panhellenic Council Residence senator.

Gonzalez received 302 votes—56.24 percent of the vote.

A total of 537 students voted for the Collegiate Panhellenic Council Residence senator.

Kristen Hoffman, junior in agricultural business, was elected as the Frederiksen Court Apartment Residence senator.

Hoffman received 30 write-in votes—20.55 percent of the vote.

A total of 146 students voted for the Frederiksen Court Apartment Residence senator.

Zachary Mass, senior in software engineering, was elected as the Interfraternity Council Residence senator.

Mass received 283 votes—89.84 percent of the vote.

A total of 315 students voted for the Interfraternity Council Residence senator.

Markus Brown, sophomore in meteorology, James Gilpatric, freshman in marketing, Daniel Pfeifer, junior in civil engineering, and Ryan Hurley, sophomore in pre-business, were elected as Inter-Residence Hall Association Residence senators.

Brown received 629 votes—30.65 percent of the vote—Gilpatric received 548 votes—26.71 percent of the vote—Pfeifer received 724 votes—35.28 percent of the vote—and Hurley received 22 write-in votes—1.07 percent of the vote.

A total of 2,052 students voted for Inter-Residence Hall Association Residence senators.

Laura Emery, junior in financial counseling and planning; Noah Heasley, junior in computer science; Matthew Klaes, junior in chemistry; Charles Klapatauskas, junior in mechanical engineering; Cheyenne Lau, sophomore in political science; Max Ruehle, junior in statistics; Logan Simonson, junior in electrical engineering; Samantha Springer, senior in psychology; Sandeep Stanley, senior in aerospace engineering; Dawson Weathers, sophomore in political science; and Mason Zastrow, junior in political science, philosophy and sociology, were elected as Off-Campus Residence senators.

Student Government winner08.JPG

Morgan Fritz, sophomore in political science, and Joshua Hanyang, senior in management information systems, embracing each other. Fritz was elected president of Student Government, and Hanyang was running against her with Lydia Greene, junior in political science.

Emery received 781 votes—8.58 percent of the vote—Heasley received 532 votes—5.84 percent of the vote—Klaes received 539 votes—5.92 percent of the vote—Klapatauskas received 594 votes—6.52 percent of the vote—Lau received 547 votes—6.01 percent of the vote—Ruehle received 569 votes—6.25 percent of the vote—Simonson received 545 votes—5.99 percent of the vote—Springer received 727 votes—7.98 percent of the vote—Stanley received 533 votes—5.85 percent of the vote—Weathers received 628 votes—6.9 percent of the vote—and Zastrow received 572 votes—6.28 percent of the vote.

A total of 9,105 students voted for Off-Campus Residence senators.

Sehba Faheem, senior in biological systems engineering, was elected as the University Student Apartment Community senator.

Faheem received 108 votes—95.58 percent of the vote.

An additional five votes went to write-in candidates.

A total of 113 students voted for the University Student Apartment Community senator.

As well on the ballot, students voted for two referendums.

One of the referendums would amend Article II, Section B, Sub-Section 3 of the Student Government constitution.

The question read, “Do you support a constitutional amendment to amend Article II, Section B, Sub-Section 3 to read ‘Only those living in Interfraternity housing or Panhellenic housing shall be considered members of their respective residency area?’”

The referendum passed with 2,795 votes in favor and 1,451 votes against.

The second referendum voted on was to overhaul the Student Government Judicial Court.

The question read, “Do you support a constitutional amendment to reform the Student Government Judicial Court?”

The referendum passed with 3,205 votes in favor and 915 votes against.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.