Gov. Kim Reynolds announced 113 new cases of COVID-19 in Iowa, bringing the total number of positive cases to 1,710 positive cases. Cass County had its first case of COVID-19, making a total of 88 of 99 counties in Iowa with positive cases.

The State Hygienics Lab has 3,565 tests available. As of the evening of April 12, there are 142 hospitalized, 741 have recovered with a recovery rate of 43%, and two additional individuals have died, one elderly adult (81+ years) in Linn County and one older adult (61-80 years) in Muscatine County, bringing the total number of deaths to 43.

Reynolds said the numbers of Iowans recovering are increasing and in a future press conference she will discuss what Iowa’s epidemic curve means for the future of COVID-19.

“These signs are encouraging but they are not a reason enough for us to let up on our mitigation efforts at this time,” Reynolds said.

Reynolds said Iowa’s peak is projected to happen later this month, and until the peak passes the number of positive cases and deaths will continue to increase.

Despite mitigation efforts early in the spread of COVID-19, Reynolds said long-term care facilities have still been struck with “devastating consequences” and account for more than 10 percent of all COVID-19 cases in Iowa, and 53 percent of deaths have been residents of care facilities.

Reynolds said the Iowa Department of Public Health is sending out the Abbott Laboratories rapid testing machine to test at long-term care facilities.

“When an essential worker tests positive for COVID-19, local public health officials are able to conduct contact tracing to determine any potential exposures that may have occurred and isolate the individuals as soon as possible to prevent further spread of the virus,” Reynolds said.

Reynolds gave on update on the Regional Medical Coordination Centers across Iowa.

In region one, which contains Polk County and the Des Moines metro, there were 38 hospitalizations, five new patients admitted in the last 24 hours, 14 patients were in the ICU and 11 were on ventilators. There were 1,365 inpatient beds available, 139 ICU beds available and 224 ventilators available for patients.

In region two, the north-central region of Iowa, there was one hospitalization, no new patients admitted in the last 24 hours, one patient was in the intensive care unit (ICU) and one was on a ventilator. There were 235 inpatient beds available, six ICU beds available and 25 ventilators available for patients.

In region three, on the western side of the state, there were two hospitalizations, one new patient admitted in the last 24 hours, one patient was in the ICU and no patients were on ventilators. There were 540 inpatient beds available, 44 ICU beds available and 59 ventilators available for patients.

In region four, on the western side of the state, there were two hospitalizations, one new patient admitted in the last 24 hours, one patient was in the ICU and no patients were on ventilators. There were 254 inpatient beds available, 37 ICU beds available and 68 ventilators available for patients.

In region five, in eastern Iowa where Johnson and Scott County are located, there were 55 hospitalizations, 12 new patients admitted in the last 24 hours, 24 patients were in the ICU and 15 were on ventilators. There were 727 inpatient beds available, 85 ICU beds available and 166 ventilators available for patients.

In region six, where Linn County is located, there were 44 hospitalizations, five new patients admitted in the last 24 hours, 29 patients were in the ICU and 14 were on ventilators. There were 1,225 inpatient beds available, 69 ICU beds available and 133 ventilators available for patients.

Reynolds urged Iowans to continue to stay home unless necessary.

“All Iowans must continue to do our part to protect our health and the health of others during this critical time,” Reynolds said.

Reynolds said she wanted to recognize the staff of the 444 long-term care facilities in Iowa, especially those working in facilities impacted by the outbreak.

“You’re more than caregivers, you are heroes on the front-line of this crisis,” Reynolds said. “And I know this situation is especially difficult for you. So thank you for showing up every day with compassion and integrity and for caring for your residents as you would your family. Please be safe, stay well, and know we will continue to do our part to protect you and to work with you.”

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