New temporary security measures are being put in place at properties owned by Campustown Property Management this week for Veishea.

Campustown Property Management, which owns properties including Legacy Towers and Cyclone Plaza, is enacting a new wristband policy for all of its residents living at their 22 properties and their guests starting April 18, 2013 and lasting through the end of Veishea.

Residents and their guests will be required to wear a wristband, which will allow them to enter the apartment building.

Each resident is allowed to have up to three guests.

The guests and residents have to go to the Campustown Property Management office and register. There they will be given a wristband to wear for the remainder of Veishea. Residents will have one color and guests will have another.

“Generally speaking, we have an influx of outside visitors during Veishea,” said Alex Sidorowych, assistant manager for Campustown Property Management. “Sometimes these guests create destruction, and we want to limit the number of people entering our buildings.”

Sidorowych also stated that they are just trying to be proactive and prevent problems. Sidorowych highlighted that stairways and hallways are a safety concern, with people blocking these areas. Destruction of property was another concern listed, with actions like vomiting and urination occurring.

Security guards will be placed at nearly all entrances and exits of buildings owned by Campustown Property Management, where they will check each person entering for a wristband. Security will also be in place for almost the whole day, except for a few hours in the morning.

“We are providing a residence for students, and we want to provide them with a clean and safe living environment,” Sidorowych said.

Sidorowych said that they had received mostly positive feedback from residents so far, and there had been a handful of people who are upset with the decision, but once the reasoning was explained to them they understood.

Sgt. Mike Arkovich of the Ames Police Department and Safe Neighborhoods Team said he sees this type of action as a good stance to take.

Arkovich said that he had never seen something like this enacted during Veishea in his time with the Ames Police.

He explained that this would reduce the number of parties happening in these buildings and would help reduce issues for the property company.

“Oftentime, we’ll go into these buildings and there are 40 to 50 people in a small two-person apartment. It’s just unsafe,” Arkovich said. “Doing this keeps the outsiders who are causing problems for them, and us, out and also helps limit who should be in these apartment buildings.”

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Matt Nosco

Is this legal? Is there something in the renters' leases that allows for something like this? Those are important questions.

Roger Smith

Overkill. Don't hassle law abiding people because a few are not. I was on campus in 70's and parties were seldom a problem.

Michael Otis

Personally, I believe that since there are so many people that usually go to those buildings during Veishea, other parties elsewhere will accumulate more people and eventually I can see another riot happening just because this was done. This is why Iowa State is very lenient with drinking during Veishea for under 21 year old dorm students, they know they're going to drink and they'd rather them be inside with their friends, then out in the town causing trouble.

David Jackson
David Jackson

If it wasn't in the lease when they signed it, I'd tell them to f-off.

If I lived there they would either let me into the apartment I'm paying them rent for, or if they attempted to stop me; be held against their will until the police arrive and be told I want to press charges against them for attempting to bar me from my own legal dwelling.

If it was in the lease however this is a lesson to read what you are signing before you sign it.